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Pavement Technology Could Cool Cities From the Ground Up (US News)

ASU researchers and the city of Phoenix are studying the use of so-called cool pavement to reduce heat island effect.

September 27, 2021
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As featured by US News:

“The (cool pavement) surface temperature is 129 Fahrenheit,” David Sailor (director of the Arizona State Urban Climate Research Center) said. “But the asphalt next to it was at least in the 150s.”

Reducing surface temperature can have direct benefits by lowering air temperature, which Sailor said has “significant implications for heat-related illness, air quality, water use, and energy use.”

“It is estimated that a 1 degree Fahrenheit reduction in air temperatures in Phoenix can result in a 1.5% to 3% reduction in residential use of potable water,” Sailor said.

This article was originally published by US News. Read the full article here.

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